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What is the proper verb to describe that the movie is no longer played in the theatre, to express following?

The movie will be closed in the theatre on this Sunday. To see with wide screen in the theatre, we have to go for that movie until Sunday.

2 Answers 2

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If it's in the future, one would usually say:

The movie closes on Sunday.

or

The movie stops playing Sunday.

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  • Can movie close itself? or movie can be closed? I feel movie supposed to be closed. If it is past, the movie closed on the last Sunday? Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 4:16
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    Well, no, a movie can't close itself, but it really doesn't matter. That's how we say it. Yes: "That movie closed last Sunday."
    – DTRT
    Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 4:22
  • closes/ends/finishes - all would be fine. The listener would be quite aware the movie isn't going to do that all by itself, but that the cinema staff would have some part to play ;) Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 12:29
  • Be careful, "ends" or "finishes" would mean the end of the movie itself, meaning the closing credits.
    – DTRT
    Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 14:28
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If the movie will not be playing at all after Sunday:

The movie will no longer be (showing/playing) in the theater starting on Sunday. To see it with wide-screen in the theater, we will have to go to see the movie before Sunday.

If Sunday is the only day that it will not be playing:

The movie will not be (showing/playing) in the theater on Sunday. To see it with wide-screen in the theater, we will have to go to see the movie before Sunday.

Note that you can use either showing/playing or showed/played.

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  • If I would like to say without "no" or "not" and with proper verb if possible. How would you say? Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 4:18
  • You can say the movie stops playing/showing on Sunday, if you really want to avoid "no" and "not."
    – LyricWulf
    Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 4:37
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    What I hear most is "It's not playing anymore." That is the most common way to say it. (Or, in your case, "It won't show after Sunday.") It is not necessary to omit "no" and "not."
    – LyricWulf
    Commented Dec 11, 2014 at 4:39

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