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This text was written by coffee1054 in this question:

We gonna show that there is no contradiction with Ohm's law.

Is there any register-conflict in this sentence?

Moved into the body of the question after the title was edited by another member:

Is it prudent for non-native speakers who wish to write formal English to learn English by listening to or reading dialogue?

  • I believe that it's fine, as long as the learner knows what they are doing. Reading what and listening to what are also important, I'd say. (By the way, I only make a comment about the title, not any other parts.) – Damkerng T. Dec 14 '14 at 13:37
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    ... That's a really heavy disconnect between your title and question content; please edit so we know which question to answer. Also, please source your quotation. – Esoteric Screen Name Dec 14 '14 at 13:47
  • I've edited the title of the question. The question comes from a paragraph submitted to this site by someone seeking grammatical advice, which is being treated as a proofreading request. I'm creating questions based on it in the hope the answers will be of help to him and be relevant for other visitors to the site. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 14 '14 at 14:24
  • @TRomano Thanks, but can you include a link to that question? And your amended title still asks a very different question than the content body does: "how should I learn" versus "is there any register conflict". The title question is off topic (opinion based) but the body question is not. – Esoteric Screen Name Dec 14 '14 at 14:30
  • @Esoteric Screen Name. We have different definitions of relevant. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 14 '14 at 14:31
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I'm going to go out on a limb here and say: "No, it's not at all prudent!" The body of your question is a relevant counter-example: it is just not at all appropriate for formal written English, despite being something you may hear in natural dialogue.

If you want to learn formal written English, then make sure you spend plenty of time studying formal written English.

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