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Right now it's hard to say if that’s happening, says Deeks, because the number of provincial cases this year has been low. "But we do have pockets where there are groups of people who tend not to immunize, and those areas are much more susceptible if mumps is introduced."(NHL mumps outbreak: 7 big questions answered - CBC news Dec 16 2014)

Is 'who tend not to immunize' right? Shouldn't it be 'who tend not to get immunized'? Thank you.

  • You should add some dictionary definitions or other research to support your question. Its often possibe to say things several different ways, but that does not make it wrong. – user3169 Dec 17 '14 at 4:55
  • Active may be fine here: if the author talks about parents declining the shots for their children, for example. – Stephie Dec 17 '14 at 5:22
  • Or it could be fine even if it means "get immunized". – snailboat Dec 17 '14 at 9:32
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Is 'who tend not to immunize' right? Shouldn't it be 'who tend not to get immunized'?

"Immunize" is usually a transitive verb. I suspect that this usage developed as an abbreviation of "immunize [their] children". The article's version sounds more formal, which (given the context) is probably a factor as well.

Your version is also correct.

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