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art : a duplication of the visual form of a person or object

psychology : the public personality or character presented by a person

business/ marketing: an advertising concept conveyed to the public

literature: a symbol or metaphor that represents something else

Would you please write or give me an example sentence for each context?

Although I have tried much, in fact, failed to write them. Or, could you please give me some advices as to where or how I could mange to write such an example or sentences?

My example( extracted from Oxford Dictionary): art: Her work juxtaposed images from serious and popular art

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Cheers, nima

  • Check out Macmillan Dictionary, 2b for your art, 3 for your literature, 1 for your psychological, business, marketing. – Damkerng T. Dec 17 '14 at 16:42
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What you have asked for is quite complicated but for art you could say " He created an image of the person " or " He copied the image "

For psychology you could say " His image in the public eye was not a good one " or " He created an image of violence.

In this case it might be better to say " He gave off an air of violence " or even " He gave off an auora of violence " if you were describing the person as if they were standing in front of you. The other sentences would be if you got the description from somebody else ( second hand information ).

Business/marketing - this is very similar to the psychology. You could use the same sentences and swap "he" for "it". But if you are talking about an advertisement it would be more positive. For example "The image it conveyed was one of excitement" or " The image it gave off was one of excitement "

Again in this case you might be better saying " It looked exciting " or " The feeling it gave off was one of excitement "

Litrature - here you can use the word imagery. " The imagery in the poem compared the rising of the sun to the beuty of a flower "

You could also say " The image of the tree in the poem was very well described " but it might be better to say " The tree was so well described that he could see it clearly in his mind "

Finally you could also say " The description created a clear image in his mind " In this case you could swap the word image for picture.

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