1

She hoped that we would not construed her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.

She hoped that we would not construe her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.

She hoped that we would not have construed her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.

Perhaps all of them are grammatically correct, but I cannot digest the difference between them. Could you please simplify them in simple English so that I can get the difference. Please also tell me which one is more used in real English, lexicaly.

2

Paraphrase:

I'll try to simplify the sentence so that the meaning is clearer. :)

The politician hoped that we would not think that her decision to run for office was an attempt to seize power.

The politician did not want us to think that she was power-hungry because she had decided to run for political office.

The politician decided to run for political office, but was worried that people would think she was power-hungry.


Sentence 1:

She hoped that we would not construed her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.

This sentence is incorrect. You can't use "would not + past participle". You have to use "would not + infinitive" or "would not + BE + past participle". For example...

She hoped that her decision to run for office would not BE construed as a thirst for power.


Sentence 2:

She hoped that we would not construe her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.

This sentence is the most correct of the three. It follows the grammatically correct format of "would not + infinitive" I mentioned above.


Sentence 3:

She hoped that we would not have construed her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.

This sentence does not sound good to my native ear. I think it is incorrect, but I am not sure. I don't recommend using it. If you want to use the perfect here, I would recommend changing the sentence to...

She HAD hoped that we would not construe her decision to run for office as a thirst for power.


Bonus:

Perhaps all of them are grammatically correct, but I cannot digest the difference between them.

I don't think "digest" is the correct verb here. Digest is what you do after you eat food. I would use the verb phrase "figure out" instead.

  • 2
    I don't think the sentence #3 should be branded as incorrect. It's valid, and also the improvement you suggested against the sentence #3 is also correct :) – Man_From_India Dec 17 '14 at 16:45
  • @Man_From_India Good point. It doesn't sound good for me, but who knows, maybe it is grammatically correct. I went ahead and updated my answer to reflect this. – AdmiralAdama Dec 17 '14 at 16:51

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