2

further (from Oxford Dictionary)

2 a longer way in the past or the future
Think further back into your childhood.


Having considered the explanation above, would you show me if my sentence below is correct? And, would you please give me other(s) alternative or interchangeable word or phrases instead of the bold parts?

If we go further forward in time....

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It's correct, but not on its own. You must talk about going forward in time before in the text. For instance:

[Paragraph talking about 1950]

If we go forward in time, to 1956 [... rest of the paragraph].

If we go further forward in time, to 1967 [... rest of the paragraph].

If we go even further forward in time, to 1981 [... rest of the paragraph].

If you want to talk about going forward in time just once, you need to take out further, because it implies that you've already traveled forward in time once.

0

There is nothing wrong with the phrase - go further forward. It's correct. But the better and more common way of saying is go further ahead

Go further forward is rarely used, and not very common. Though it is completely correct.

The sentence you wrote with the phrase - go further forward - is not a complete sentence, and so doesn't mean anything. You have to form a complete sentence to make that sentence correct. Of course you already are aware of that.

For alternatives you can use synonyms of go(choose synonyms carefully, according to what meaning you want to convey) and then add further ahead/forward.

  • Thanks. Nonetheless, I am wondering other alternatives as to "in time" – nima Dec 19 '14 at 17:58
  • @nima You can use "by and by", or "in future" :) – Man_From_India Dec 20 '14 at 3:41

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