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I have been to California( I have visited California)

What's the most beautiful place you've ever visited?

What's the most beautiful place you've ever been there?

What's the most beautiful place you've ever been to?

Having taken into account the italic part, would you please throw a light on if the bold parts are correct?

Any help would be greatly appreciated

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Why would you want to use the adverb there?

I think you can see the relationship between the indicative and the interrogative:

1 I have visited California. It was the most beautiful place I've ever visited. What's the most beautiful place you've ever visited?

Use the same pattern with been to.

2 I have been to California. It was the most beautiful place I've ever been to. What's the most beautiful place you've ever been to?

That is the pattern. Why do you want to use there? Or why do you think you would need to use there?

You could use there in the following way:

I have been to California. It was the most beautiful place I've ever been to. Have you been there also? (Or: Have you ever been there?)

This uses the adverb there in the same way you asked about in your question about 'been there' (adverb) or 'been to there' (noun). Again, the first choice, there as an adverb is the way native speakers express this, at least in AmE, BrE, and Australian English.

And while I'm at it, let me mention that in the US, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa... the idiomatic way to ask the question is indeed:

What's the most beautiful place you've ever been to?

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What's the most beautiful place you have ever been to?

seems better because there's no need to include adverb 'there'. You have already introduced 'most beautiful place' in your question. This could have been proper in sentence like...

What's the most beautiful place there in Canada?


A little note:

I'd use which because here, you are asking someone to choose from the several places visited. In such context, what defines and which selects.

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