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A transpired, for which I thank you, by which B abided, about which D wrote, ...

1. In the model sentence above, what are the italicised words called? I'm guessing prepositional clause? What are some formal terms describing this question?

2. How can I preserve the structure of this sentence with the relative clauses, but writing which only once? This question 2 is what ought to be expressed by this question's title.

[See para 4 for a real example]: the other was a proposition from Mr George Th. Taylor of Prince George expressive of sentiments similar to those which have been declared by other legislatures of the union on our controversy with France, in the place of which was substituted by a majority of twenty nine a counter proposition termed an amendment which was offered by Colo. Nicholas of Albermarle and which seems calculated to evince to France and to the world, that Virginia is very far from harmonizing with the American government or her sister States.

closed as unclear what you're asking by FumbleFingers, Chenmunka, StoneyB, Dinusha, ColleenV Dec 24 '14 at 10:40

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  • "Model sentence"? All I see is a meaningless string of unrelated clauses. I can't imagine any context where all those clauses could co-exist in one coherent sentence. What are you actually trying to say? – FumbleFingers Dec 23 '14 at 15:00
  • D wrote about the law that B obeyed and that I am thankful was passed. But I suppose that doesn't keep the structure nor use which once. – Jim Dec 23 '14 at 16:13
2

A way to avoid repeating "which" is to break the passage up into multiple sentences. Retaining some of the features of the passage which was written over 200 years ago, we might write instead:

The other was a proposition from Mr George Th. Taylor of Prince George expressive of sentiments similar to those which have been declared by other legislatures of the union on our controversy with France. A counter proposal, termed an 'amendment', was substituted by a majority of twenty nine. Offered by Colo. Nicholas of Albermarle, it seems calculated to evince to France and to the world, that Virginia is very far from harmonizing with the American government or her sister States.

  • Lawyers seem to like run-on sentences with seemingly random sprinklings of commas - that way they can move one later & reverse a decision ;-) – Tetsujin Dec 23 '14 at 20:02
  • Tell me about it ;-) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 23 '14 at 23:52

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