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I become confused when I need use who or whom with a preposition like with..

Could you tell me please which sentences below are grammatically correct or colloquial?

People who I would like to be friend should be..

People who I would like to be friend with should be..

People I would like to be friend should be..

People I would like to be friend with should be..

People whom I would like to be friend..

People whom I would like to be friend with...

I think when we used "whom" we do not have to use a preposition but this time another question comes up here is that when I should use who + preposition..

for example

Do I have to use a preposition with the verbs "move in" or "date" (or it is just about being familiar with this collocations)

She is not a kind of girl (who) I can move in/date with?

or

She is not a kind of girl (who) I can move in/date ?

Thank you

  • If you heard this verbally, you may have mixed up "be friend" with befriend, befriend means to make friends with someone and so "People who I would like to befriend should be" is valid. – Vality Dec 27 '14 at 13:37
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These are basically fixed constructions in English. You are friends with someone. Note the -s! Also, the with is not optional.

You are free to use whom or leave it out. Who is technically not correct in this case. Not everybody will consider it incorrect if you use who, though.

These sentences are all correct, read them carefully to understand how they are different and how they are similar:

These are people who are my friends.
These are people I am friends with.
These are people with whom I am friends.
People I am friends with, should be...
People with whom I am friends should be...
People whom I am friends with should be...

As for you other sentences, the verbs date and move in are not used in a similar way, so you cannot use them in a similar sentence! You date someone (not with someone), but you move in with someone (moving in someone would be possible, but it is a very graphical description that you might want to keep to yourself unless you are a baby moving inside your mother!)

She is not the kind of girl I would date.
She is not the kind of girl I would move in with.

  • Thank you for clear answer.I got your examples.Can I make it clear that if we don't use reduced relative clause forms then the last two sentences should be written as : "She is not the kind of girl who (not whom )I would date." and "She is not the kind of girl whom ( not who ) I would move in with" ? – Mrt Dec 27 '14 at 12:27
  • @murat Who is standard in casual English; in formal English whom is required, but these are not utterances which are likely to arise in formal English. In any case, this is a very good reason to employ reduced relatives when you can: you avoid the necessity of picking one or the other! – StoneyB Dec 27 '14 at 14:00
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The rule book says "Who" is the subject in a sentence, "Whom" is the object, and is also used after a preposition.

As a native Englishman, I can tell you that few of us ever use "Whom", in any circumstance.

We do say "Make friends with..." not "Make friend with...".

There is a new usage of "friend" connected with social media. "Will you friend me on Facebook?" Similar to "Please Inbox me", meaning "Please send me an email". (But not, for some reason "Didn't you get my message, I Outboxed you". Go figure!) Pedants may frown at making a verb out of a noun in this way, but it's become well established.

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