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Hello there~ I have a question and I am confused about it. So, help please~ Here is the question:

(1)"I want to travel around so that I can write where I will go and what I will do in my blog."

(2)"I want to travel around so that I can write where I went and what I did in my blog."

Are they correct?? I used different tenses in these two sentences. Which one is correct?

and how about this one:

(1)"I want to do an internship so that I can write what I'll do through the experience on my resume."

(2)"I want to do an internship so that I can write what I did through the experience on my resume."

The question: Which one is correct?

and this one:

(1)"He is going to write a book next year, and he will give me the book which he will write."

(2)"He is going to write a book next year, and he will give me the book which he wrote."

which one is correct?

When it comes this case(seeing things from the future), how to use the tense in clauses correctly?? And, if you guys can explain how to use the tense in these kinds of sentences, it will be great!

From my point of view, I think those sentences labeled as (1) sound more correct to me, but I am not sure about it.

Below, I explain how I think of English tenses. Could you tell me whether my thought is correct??

I think the tenses of English language are all relative to the present (the moment i speak). That means things we want to talk about need to be compared with the present in order to know which tense we should use. Dispite the fact that past perfect can be relative to the past, it is also relative to the present,if not, it would be just past tense(if our datum mark is the time in the past). Um~ I mean because datum mark is the present(the moment i speak), past perfect can be used as past perfect. It is a little hard to explain my thought, but i believe you guys can get my idea.

  • How about "[...] and he will give me the book that he will have written (by then)."? – Avigrail Jan 15 '15 at 11:33
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I'm afraid it's more complicated than that.

Your (1) sentences are not correct.

The datum mark, as you call it, is in fact not the present, but the time that you are referencing. So we could have a construction like:

Tomorrow, I'm going to look at the homework that my students did.

Not

Tomorrow, I'm going to look at the homework that my students will do.

Because the datum, as you call it - the reference point - here, is tomorrow, and from that perspective, my students (hopefully!) will have done their homework.

Now, your cases are a little different.

This is very much not correct:

(1)"I want to travel around so that I can write where I will go and what I will > do in my blog."

However, I wouldn't say

(2)"I want to travel around so that I can write where I went and what I did in my > blog."

necessarily, either.

Here, one imagines that in the future, you are traveling and writing at the same time. That means that, in fact, your blogging is really, compared to your "datum", in the present tense.

Best would be to say:

I want to travel so that I can write about where I go and what I do in my blog.

Incidentally, notice that I removed "around" after travel. Around is unidiomatic in this case - usually around is used as an adjective, as in "travel around Southeast Asia". It could also be used as a kind of minimizer, as in "What are you doing in Vietnam?" "Oh, just traveling around." But in a declarative sentence like yours, it doesn't belong.

Also "write about" not "write."

Note that you could use the construction that you have if the implication were different, as in:

I want to travel so that when I get home, I can write a book about where I went and what I did.

In your second, again, (1) is totally incorrect. (2) is good, though there are some other, unrelated issues.

Most idiomatic would be:

I want to do an internship so that I can put it on my resume.

:) But, even though it sounds a little clunky,

I want to do an internship so that I can write about what I did on my resume.

Is totally fine. But you don't "do through" an experience in English.

As for your third case, (2) nails it.

2)"He is going to write a book next year, and he will give me the book which he wrote."

Perfect. Well, it actually should be "that" he wrote, but most native speakers get that one wrong, so don't worry about it.

  • Sometimes, I hear sentence like "He will know what crop will grow best on his farm." or " He will know what we will probably do in certain circumstances". Why do people use "will" in these cases? Shouldn`t they be simple present or something just like you said?? And, if my brother and I are doing something bad now, can I say"Stop, mom will know what we are doing now! ", or I should say "Stop, mom will know what we were doing now! "? Sorry, what I wrote might sound a little offensive. I am not trying to prove you wrong. I am just confused. These things are kind of tricky here... – vincentlin Dec 29 '14 at 14:26
  • No, it's not offensive at all. These are subtle things. – Joshua Penman Jan 2 '15 at 2:47
  • No, it's not offensive at all. These are subtle things. "He will know what crop will grow best on his farm" is fine. Because the crop-growing is also in the FUTURE to his knowing. As far as the second sentence, "he will know what we will probably do," this is definitely not correct. This is a question of a conditional situation, and best put as "He will know what we WOULD probably do in certain circumstances." As for the latter, yes, although I wouldn't put it in the continous past. "Stop, mom will know what we did!" sounds best to me. – Joshua Penman Jan 2 '15 at 2:56
  • However "Stop, mom will know what we are doing" would be correct as well, but that implies that in the future, WHILE YOU ARE STILL DOING IT, mom may find out (like she might come in the front door). If she might just find out later, after the thing is done, then "Stop, mom will know what we did" is perfect. – Joshua Penman Jan 2 '15 at 2:57

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