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As I am having some new options to describe one of my earlier post regarding to the following two constructions making into one sentence, I want to post this once again with my options.

If I say main two things which I want to include separately,

  1. Testing of previously fixed edge and currently fixed edge is done in order to maintain the correct alignment of the boundary segments.
  2. previously fixed edge and currently fixed edge are relevant to the two successive corners but associated with a same polygon.

after joining above 2 into one sentence I have following options

  • Testing of previously fixed edge and currently fixed edge, relevant to the two successive corners but associated with a same polygon, is done in order to maintain the correct alignment of the boundary segments.

  • Testing of the previously fixed edge and the currently fixed edge is done to maintain the correct alignment of the boundary segments; these edges refer to two successive corners associated with a same polygon.

  • Currently fixed edge is compared with the previous fixing which is relevant to the predecessor of the current corner and associated with the same polygon in order to maintain the correct alignment of the boundary segments.

AS this point is very important for my writing, I want your assistant to say this in a formal way.

  • I'd love to help, but, even with the figure, I'm still having trouble understanding what you are trying to describe. First, the "currently fixed edge" and the "previously fixed edge" both look like same edge. Why is one previous and the other current? Are Corner 1 and Corner 2 part of two different polygons, and the segment is moved, with one endpoint remaining in the same place, and the other end point moving from Corner 1 to Corner 2? That's my best interpretation, but I don't want to go any further until I know for sure that's the correct way to interpret what you're trying to say. – J.R. Mar 23 '13 at 21:36
  • By the way, your middle sentence reads rather well. Also, are you working in stereolithography, by chance? – J.R. Mar 23 '13 at 21:38
  • @J.R.: Thanks for the cooperation. I am fixing one corner after the other and finally I want to get a rectangle having crossed diagonals. I showed one side of it. I am fixing this iteratively. – niro Mar 23 '13 at 21:42
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    Also, can you tell us what you mean by "fixed"? The word "fixed" can mean "repaired," or it can mean "put into an immovable position". In this context, those would be opposite meanings! You might "fix" (repair) an edge by moving it, or you might "fix" (affix) an edge by not allowing it to be moved. – J.R. Mar 23 '13 at 21:47
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    Typically, unless it's destructive testing, testing does not change anything about the item under test it simply verifies that the measured result is equal to the expected result. So it's not the testing that maintains the alignment it's some sort of adjustment that is made based on the result of testing. So you might say, "Adjustments based on testing are made to maintain the alignment ..." The interesting things here are the adjustment algorithm and the test procedure. – Jim Mar 23 '13 at 22:18
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The second of your choices is not bad, if you break it into two shorter sentences, and fix some minor problems with articles. (The struck-through words would be deleted, the italicized words added.)

Testing of the a previously-fixed edge and the currently-fixed edge is done to maintain the correct alignment of the boundary segments. These edges are parts of two successive corners associated with a same single polygon.

The first and third choices either don't make sense or are too convoluted to be worth including. That is, they do not communicate well enough to be worth room on the page; people will understand things better if you just leave out sentences like the first and third.

Rather than trying to jam everything into a single long sentence, try to write using several short and clear sentences that follow in logical succession.

  • I like this answer, although I would leave in the word two in the expression "two successive corners." I realize "successive" sort of implies "two", but this is hard enough to visualize that I think the word "two" could be included in this particular case. Also, @niro: I would include a LOT of figures in your paper, if you're able to include them without going over your page limit. – J.R. Mar 24 '13 at 9:32

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