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I have a doubt on my construction. Here is my original idea. i have written it in 2 sentences.

Outer bounds are fixed using method A. Method A leads to a closed polygon having preserved their symmetries.

if i combine them,

Outer bounds are fixed using method A which leads to a closed polygon having preserved their symmetries.

My first question is does this full sentence is correct?

As far as I know, i think this Which refers to method A, not the Outer bounds. that is to the object.

Let me take another example,

She is my wife. She is sitting on the corner.

So, I think if i combine them, it would be like

She is my wife who is sitting on the corner.

So i think this who refers to the she, i.e. subject

So, my second question is either subject or object, the clause like which, that can be used just after the first sentence? If I ask it another way, I want to know the place where I should put which, who or that etc. Does it goes to same place whether it refers subject or object? Any rule for that like SUBJECT+OBJECT+WHICH+...

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For the given sentences

  1. Outer bounds are fixed using method A.
  2. Method A leads to a closed polygon having preserved their symmetries.

If they are both separate, and the first has no consequence on the second and vice versa, then your construction using which can be considered wrong. A better example of the construction can be

  1. Method A fixes the outer bounds or leads to a closed polygon having preserved their symmetries.
  2. Method A leads to a closed polygon having preserved their symmetries or fixes the outer bounds.

But if the construction of closed polygon is dependent on its outer bounds being fixed then your construction can be considered correct.

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