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The new Christmas card [along with / together with] the letter has to be sent out.

When I was writing a short message to my little sister, I came up with a few questions:

  1. If I use "has", does this imply that the new Christmas card and the letter will be put into the same envelope?
  2. If I use "have", does this imply that the new Christmas card and the letter will be sent out separately?
  3. Are along with and together with interchangeable?
  4. What if I rewrite the above sentence this way?

    The new Christmas card and the letter have to be put together into same envelope before sending them out.

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It's incorrect to use have in the first sentence, since the subject ("Christmas card") is singular regardless of the adjunctive phrase ("along with the letter").

Along with and together with are interchangeable, and to my ear, neither implies whether they should be in separate envelopes.

Even if there is some indication one way or the other, it's best not to leave specific instructions up to implication. If you have to ask about it, chances are very good that it will go over your sister's head.

But as you addressed all these concerns at the end of the question, I feel I hardly need to interfere:

The new Christmas card and the letter have to be put together into the same envelope before sending them out.

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