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A: I have a bus.
B:Have you a bus?

Here have is used to make a question by bring have in the beginning of a sentence. My question is can we behave the same toward have in perfect tenses? For example, in emphasizing sentences we bring modal first, as in:

Little have I knowledge of that subject.

have came almost first. Can I do the same on a sentence making the following sentence?

Also less often have managers used praise and acclamation as a motivating factor.

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    Your second sentence is okay. Your first one isn't. You could say any of: Little do I know on that subject. Or Little knowledge do I have on that subject. Or Little knowledge have I of that subject. Or Knowledge of that subject have I little. – Jim Jan 4 '15 at 1:41
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    "Have you a bus?",or "little knowledge do I have on that subject" is grammatically OK but highly non-idiomatic, at least in the US. Prefer "Do you have a bus?" or "I know little about that subject". Also it would be much more common to say "I don't know much..." than "I know little...". – James King Jan 4 '15 at 2:48
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    1) Have is not a modal. 2) In your first three sentences it is a lexical verb: an ordinary verb equivalent to possess. Have in this sense is only rarely fronted today; that use has been steadily declining for 150 years. 3) "Little have I knowledge" is not idiomatic; "Little knowledge do I have" is aceptable but very literary. 4) Have in your last sentence is an auxiliary. Less often have managers used is acceptable, but the also in front of it is unusual; it would ordinarily occur only if parallelling the same structure in the previous sentence. – StoneyB on hiatus Jan 4 '15 at 3:54
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Have you a bus?

While that may be gramatically correct, using that in normal conversation would probably earn you some weird looks. Try using

Do you have a bus?

instead.

Little have I knowledge of that subject.

I'm not sure myself of the grammatical correctness here, but again that sounds awkward (and a bit like Yoda from the film Star Wars!).

I have little knowledge of that subject

would be better.

Also less often have managers used praise and acclamation as a motivating factor.

This sentence doesn't really make sense. You might be trying to say either:

[also] Managers used praise and acclamation for motivation less often.

As a motivating factor, managers used praise and acclamation less.

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  • Oh Gosh! I don't want to look like Yoda! – codezombie Jan 4 '15 at 10:25
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    @MehdiHaghgoo It's OK. You won't look like Yoda. Only sound like Yoda, you will. – David Richerby Jan 4 '15 at 12:18

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