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I'll be at my uncle's house just in case you need to reach me.

I'll be at my uncle's house should you need to reach me.

Could you tell me what is the difference between those?

  • From Macmillan, in case (AmE) 1. if; 2. in order to be prepared for something that may happen; 3. used for explaining why you are doing something. Compared to the same entry, but in BrE: 1. in order to be prepared for something that may happen; 2. used for explaining why you are doing something; 3. [mainly American] if. Isn't that interesting? – Damkerng T. Jan 6 '15 at 13:20
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In the given context, there's no difference. They mean the same.

'just in case' is the idiom used to mean -in the event that (something happens) i.e. in that condition

should is also used as 'if' and thus, this word too talks about the condition -in the event that/if something happens.

should -expresses a condition i.e. just in case!

  • 2
    I would read "just in case" as implying an event less likely than the one referenced by "should". Just my personal feeling though. – IanF1 Jan 5 '15 at 7:36
  • @IanF1 'Should' works that way as well. Just in case if you have a query, contact us = Should you have any query, contact us. -for example. – Maulik V Jan 5 '15 at 7:40
  • Thanks. Nevertheless, your ideas have yet to present a more detailed and accurate answer or explanation, because one of my friend adviced to me""'Should' just expresses that the possibility of happening is more remote." – nima Jan 5 '15 at 7:52
  • Even in official emails where an instant reply is expected, we put should. It simply means that should works for 'the near future' as well! :) – Maulik V Jan 5 '15 at 8:55
  • would you give me an example as ti the statement above? – nima Jan 10 '15 at 10:53
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But of course there is a difference but not in answering but in asking. :) Let me alter the sentences somewhat to clarify meaning. In case: I go to my uncle's house anyway - so I'll be there if you need me and I'll be there if you do not. If: I stay here but will go to my uncle's house when and only when you need me, and if you don't need me then I remain at home..

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