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I think they have the same meaning but I am not sure, because I found people who have higher social statuses, such as, my former school principal, and my teachers, like to use "As to" and "As for", for example,

"As for the cooking course on this Saturday, no student is allowed..."
"All students must be on time as to ..."

Please correct me if I am wrong, teachers!

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They generally don't have the same meaning.

As for sth. changes the focus of the conversation. It is almost always used to draw a contrast; it can often be thought of as an equivalent of however.

My brother loves blueberry pie. As for me, I think it's disgusting.

Here, as for me can be neatly replaced by however.

My brother loves blueberry pie. However, I think it's disgusting.

When being used only to change focus and not to draw a contrast, as for sth. can be an equivalent to regarding.

I really must do some laundry. And as for these dirty dishes, I don't know when I'll have time to wash them.

So here it merely changes focus. However wouldn't work here because both the laundry and the dishes must be cleaned, not one or the other.

I really must do some laundry. And regarding these dirty dishes, I don't know when I'll have time to clean them.

(The last sentence isn't entirely natural speech, but the meaning is clear.)

As to in your example means in order to.

You must arrive early as to see Henry before he leaves for the airport.

As to is formal, almost pretentious in everyday speech, but commonly used in the workplace.

Sometimes it's said as so as to, which is even more formal and pretentious, except in the workplace. And even then, it can sound a little pretentious.

You must arrive early so as to see Henry before he leaves for the airport.

"In order to" and "(so) as to" are too formal for everyday speech. The most common way to express this is so [someone] can, e.g. "so you can," "so I can," "so they can," etc.

You must arrive early so you can see Henry before he leaves for the airport.

And now for the exception. As to is occasionally used as a synonym for as for [regarding], but that is very formal, almost archaic, and almost always perceived as pretentious. A movie villain might say "as to":

As to your friends, we are quite safe from them here on this fully operational battle station.

Replacing as to with as for...

As for your friends, we are quite safe from them here on this fully operational battle station.

...and replacing as for with regarding

Regarding your friends, we are quite safe from them here on this fully operational battle station.

My advice? Forget about the exception, learn the difference between as for [however] and as for [regarding], and say so [someone] can instead of "(so) as to" or "in order to".

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