1

I now know how many evils the world is riddled with.

Is this like, How many evils the world is riddled with!

namely, an exclamation sentence?

2

I now know how many evils the world is riddled with.

This clause could be either an interrogative clause, or an exclamative clause type. It's ambiguous. The sentence with the embedded interrogative clause would have the following kind of meaning:

  • I now know the answer to the question how many evils is the world riddled with.

The sentence with the exclamative clause means something like:

  • I now know that the world is so riddled with evils!

Hope this is helpful!

  • Hmm ... seems to me that an exclamative reading calls for different pointing: "I now know: How many evils the world is riddled with!" – StoneyB on hiatus Jan 8 '15 at 17:17
0

No. The technical term for this construction is free (or fused) relative clause.

Clauses of this sort open with wh- form such as who, what, where, how, how many, which acts a sort of ‘variable’ whose actual ‘value’ is alluded to but not named in the sentence. These clauses may act in the same role as an ordinary noun phrase, as Subject, Object, object of a preposition, and so forth.

Some grammarians give this construction a different name when it ‘stands for’ the answer to a question, as it does in your example: embedded question.

(We have several questions here on the tag which furnish more examples of these constructions and more information about them.)

In your example, the clause acts as object of the verb know. The sentence may be paraphrased

I now know the quantity of evils the world is riddled with. OR
I now know the answer to the question ‘How many evils is the world riddled with?’

But those are rather literal readings. What the author probably means is something like

I now realize that the number of evils with which the world is riddled is very large.

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