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(1). He has been running his own business since graduation.
(2). He has been running his own business after graduation.

I don't know the difference between "since graduation" and "after graduation" when referring to time.

Without given any date in each sentence, which of the above sentences implies that he has run his business at an earlier time? (1) or (2)?

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    We need more detail than what you've provided here... What is the question? What are your thoughts about which one is correct? If we understand what you are thinking, we can write a better answer.
    – ColleenV
    Jan 9, 2015 at 0:13
  • Have you tried looking at the definitions of since and after? I probably wouldn't use "after" with "has been running" - I would use the simple past "He ran".
    – ColleenV
    Jan 9, 2015 at 16:25

1 Answer 1

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The second sentence doesn't make sense. If you want to express a time frame you'd use the first.

Sentence 1

He has been running his own business since graduation.

This means he currently runs his own business, and he started running his own business at or very near graduation and is still running it today. This is emphasizing him running his business during the entire time-frame from graduation to present.

Sentence 2

He has been running his own business after graduation.

This doesn't make sense. Has been running... implies that this is an ongoing activity and to complete that sentence you'd need a continuous time-frame.

  • He has been running his own business for ten years.
  • He has been running his own business since he was a child.

The simple non-progressive moment in time "after graduation" is not a suitable tense. That would be like saying He has been running his own business in January. this is a verb tense confusion.

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    You could, however, have a perfectly grammatical and tense-agreed sentence with He has been running his own business since after graduation. Jan 9, 2015 at 19:35
  • What about He has been running his own business from graduation. Would this be right?
    – Phoenix
    May 24, 2015 at 10:19
  • @Phoenix From would imply where he was running his business. Like "...running his own business from Canada." So "from graduation" wouldn't make sense.
    – leigero
    May 24, 2015 at 23:41

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