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I have passed the final exam at university.
My father has already promised to pay me a holiday to London if I pass/passed.

Should we use "pass" or "passed" here?

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  • 3
    Hello & welcome to the site. Please note that we are not a proofreading service - enter your own thoughts on the subjects and we will be happy to add ours.
    – Stephie
    Jan 9, 2015 at 15:39
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    Is the first sentence intended to establish a fact that we should use when we are making sense of the second sentence?
    – TimR
    Jan 9, 2015 at 23:53

2 Answers 2

1

I would say:

My father has/had already promised to pay me a holiday to London if I pass.

The timeframe of pass is when the father made the promise, so present tense is fine.

Has or had could be used depending on other context.

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Usually, in conditional type 1 sentences, if-clause is in the simple present and the main clause is in the future, for example, my father will pay me a holiday to London if I pass my final exam at university.

I think the main clause "my father has already promised to pay........London" indicates the event to take place in the future. So I think it's grammatically correct if you say "My father has already promised to pay me a holiday to London if I pass the final exam.

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