1

I'm a bit confused with the sentences below:

  1. I know you're in there
  2. What was the point of sending us in there
  3. She'd been in there all afternoon

I sense they're clear for me, but I don't know whether to relate that in to the verbs or associate it with there thinking of just in there?

Thanks

1
  • 1
    Welcome to ELL.SE! Please take some of your time to visit the help center or take a tour of the site.
    – M.A.R.
    Jan 9, 2015 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

1
  1. I know you're in there. (in = inside)
  2. What was the point of sending us in there (in = into, towards)
  3. She'd been in there all afternoon (in = inside)

The preposition in relates to the adverb of place there in all three cases, so there are no phrasal verbs with in in any of the sentences.

There indeed exists a phrasal verb to send in, and had the word there been absent in sentence 2, we could've said it contained it:

What was the point of sending us in?

2

"in there" is short for "in that house/room/place/box there". You can choose any other noun that fits. The noun is dropped because from the situation it is clear what the speaker means.

1
  • A nice explanation, easier to understand than my jargon-filled one. (0: Jan 9, 2015 at 19:19

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .