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Source: pp 101-102, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux

[continued herefrom]..., and how sorry we were to see your honourable mind wounded with so just cause of grief as seemeth to have grown of our Deputy’s over-strait dealing towards you, to whom we have by our letters presently sent unto him signified how greatly we do mislike the same: as also commanded him not only to [1.] further hereafter your service to the uttermost of his power, but also to seek by all the means he may to repair the decay of your reputation and credit, that lately hath ensued by his hasty and violent breaking of the said enterprize: [2.] wherein our hope is that he will so deal, [3.] upon this our advertisements given him, as our service shall be furthered, your honor repaired, aid the disagreement that appearth to be between you removed.

1. Please confirm if 'further' is just used a verb (ie: with the meaning of 'promote')?

2. Definition 1 states that this means 'in which', but what's the antecedent of the pronun 'which'?

3. As written, this clause is grammatically and syntactically wrong, so how do I reorder it to understand it?

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  1. Further is indeed a verb here, with the approximate meaning you suggest.

  2. Wherein refers to the entire preceding clause headed by we have ... sent: Our hope in communicating these 'advertisements' to the Deputy is that he will deal in such-and-such a manner.

  3. Don't be troubled by singular this with plural advertisements. If you like you may parse this as a pronoun with the same referent as wherein, and our advertisements as an appositive, as if our advertisements were enclosed in parentheses; but the Elizabethans were not so picky about concord as we are today. Shakespeare, for instance:

    These high wild hills and rough uneven ways
    Draws out our miles, and makes them wearisome. RII, II,3

    Their encounters, though not personal, hath been royally attorneyed. WT, I,1

         Three parts of him
    Is ours already. JC, I,3

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