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hello im having serious trouble identifying the clauses in these sentences.

A healthy diet should be a balanced one with a variety of foods from each of the food groups. Obviously, these should be eaten in the right proportions.

Being the bodys main source of energy, starchy foods such as potatoes, rice and pasta should make up a third of your diet. Try to select the whole grain variety of these essential carbohydrates.

My problem is that all my references and resources always refer to a 3rd party. like

He will They do She did

but nowhere is my references does it use the word your.

Any help would be appreciated.

  • 4
    Welcome to ELL, Scott! It's unclear what your question is. Do you want to find all the subordinate clauses in the text? How does that relate to third-party constructions? – CowperKettle Jan 12 '15 at 12:06
  • yes sorry that is what i mean i want to find the subourdinate clauses in those sentences. what i mean in that all my reference materiel the subject is always someone else but in these examples the subject is me and its thrown me off. – Scott Jan 12 '15 at 12:09
  • Why should it, Scott? This can help. – M.A.R. Jan 12 '15 at 16:33
  • One really can't discover what your problems are. Try to think about it and put forward one single problem. I think it would be too much to answer all your questions in one post. – rogermue Jun 16 '15 at 6:22
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The four sentences of your text contain no subordinate clauses. A subordinate clause must contain

  • 1 a subordinating conjunction (when, as, while, because, although etc)

  • 2 a subject

  • 3 a verb

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Clauses have a subject and verb. When you have a single sentence with two subject-verb pairs, then you are possibly dealing with subordinate clauses. But none of your sentences have more than one clause.

This might be potentially confusing:

Being the body's main source of energy, starchy foods such as potatoes, rice and pasta should make up a third of your diet.

You might think being here is a verb, but it's not (-ing words are not verbs - they can be part of verbs if preceded by a form of to be). So the phrase "Being the body's main source of energy" has no subject-verb pair and it is not a clause.

This article explains that subordinate clauses often are preceded by the following common conjunctions or relative pronouns:

after, although, as, because, before, even if, even though, if, provided, rather than, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, whether, while

how, that, what, when, where, which, who, whom, whose, why

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A healthy diet (subject)

should be (verb)

a balanced one (object, "one" here refers back to "diet")

with a variety of foods from each of the food groups. (subordinate clause)

Obviously, (adverbial subordinate clause)

these (subject,"these" refers back to "foods" in the previous sentence)

should be eaten (verb phrase)

in the right proportions. (subordinate clause)

Being the body's main source of energy, (subordinate clause)

starchy foods (subject)

such as potatoes, rice and pasta (subordinate clause)

should make up (verb phrase)

a third of your diet. (object)

Try to select (verb phrase - subject (you) is omitted in imperative tense)

the whole grain variety (object noun phrase)

of these essential carbohydrates. (subordinate clause)

  • 2
    A clause is a sentence with a subject and a verb that is added to a main clause, What you see as clauses (in bold print) are everything but no clauses. – rogermue Jun 16 '15 at 6:10
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    This is a nice explanation of the difference between phrases and clauses. These are phrases. – BobRodes Jun 16 '15 at 7:26

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