1

Here's a contact number, in case there should be a problem.

( I have seen this version in a dictionary )

My own rephrased sentences:

  1. Here's a contact number, just in case there should be a problem.
  2. Here's a contact number, in case there is a problem.
  3. Here's a contact number, in case should there be a problem.
  4. Here's a contact number, should there be a problem just in case.
  5. Here's a contact number, should there be a problem in case.
  6. Here's a contact number, there should be a problem just in case.

It would be appreciated, if someone could throw some light on the differences between these. I need some more detailed information.

Please feel free to ask me any further question.

Many thanks

  • 2
    Sentences 1 and 2 mean much the same as the original; sentences 3,4, and 5 are ungrammatical, and sentence 6 is a weird, but possibly grammatical sentence in which you give someone your contact number while telling them that a problem will occur "just in case," as if they had some need of an additional problem. A more sensible version of this would be, (From an inept plumber to a person whose toilet he just repaired:) "Here's a contact number. Perhaps I should leave the plunger just in case." – Jason Patterson Jan 13 '15 at 12:43
  • Remind me not to use your plumber, just in case he's run out of plungers ;-) – gone fishin' again. Jan 13 '15 at 13:20
  • Nima, in one of your question I have shown that using "should" in conditional sentence just adds the fact that the event being described in that conditional clause is too unlikely. In another answer I remember I have shown how "should" itself can form a conditional clause without the need of "if". Another information "should" can in the same way form conditional without the use of "in case". I see you have already asked some question regarding "in case" as well as "should" in conditional sentence. Please tell what is your problem. Without knowing that how people will answer you? – Man_From_India Jan 13 '15 at 17:36
0

Like @JasonPatterson said, points three to six aren't grammatically correct. In fact point six is almost saying "Here is my phone number, I will make sure there's a problem"!

Points one and two are identical in meaning.

| improve this answer | |
  • Number 4 can be salvaged by splitting: Here's a contact number, should there be a problem. Just in case. – virolino Mar 19 '19 at 10:03

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