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Is there a difference between these words? For instance:

Downing Street demanded a replacement, insisting that the Prime Minister would only be interviewed by a man

and

No one can demand a dialogue and insist only on being heard, as is happening today.

Can we replace demand with insist and vice versa with the same meaning here? BTW, as I've noticed insist's usually used with "on"... insist on, but demand isn't. Is it correct?

Could we ever use demand on? For instance,

Downing Street demanded on a replacement, insisting that the Prime Minister would only be interviewed by a man

or

No one can demand on a dialogue and insist only on being heard, as is happening today.

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Demand on and demanded on are definitely wrong.

This sentence has basically the same meaning as the original though:

Downing Street insisted on a replacement, demanding that the Prime Minister would only be interviewed by a man

Demanded has a slightly more stern meaning than insisted on.

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    And in the second example "insist" was used in the second instance primarily to avoid repetition. As to usage, OP is correct that "insist" is used with "on", so in such a case "insist on" is similar to "demand". Note, however, that either "demand that" or "insist that" can be used. Often this constuction has varied connotation; one usually "demands that" something be done, but might "insist that" something is true. As jgritty said, more stern—more urgent, more imperative. Compare "command". – Brian Hitchcock Jan 15 '15 at 10:57

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