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guys.
Could you please tell me which sentence is wrong and which is right?
This question asks to select the wrong sentence and there is only one answer.
However, I assume this question has at least two or more, and yet I can't be sure.

1. It is stupid of you to do it.
2. He has no house to live.
3. She left her vilage never to return.
4. The box is light enough for him to carry.
5. I think she has good study habit.

closed as off-topic by user6951, Chenmunka, starsplusplus, Ben Kovitz, Stephie Jan 16 '15 at 12:16

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified. See: Alternative websites for proofreading" – Community, Chenmunka, starsplusplus, Ben Kovitz, Stephie
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    Please add more of your thoughts: Which sentences do you think are correct, which are not - and why? We are happy to help, explain and correct, but we will not do the work for you. – Stephie Jan 15 '15 at 8:14
  • Also, since the sentences aren't related in any way, you should really ask about each one as a separate question. We prefer to keep one "question" per question here, as it makes the site more organised, gives each question fuller answers and makes it easier to search. – starsplusplus Jan 16 '15 at 9:11
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Well, this just seems like a poorly written test.

2 He has no house to live in.

3 She left her village never to return.

5 I think she has good study habits

All three of these sentences have some small flaw. #3 is just a misspelling of village.

So, it's probably either 2 or 5. I'd lean towards 2.

1 and 4 look correct.

  • Thanks for answering. As for number 5... I wonder if it is fine as well like this? : I think she has a good study habit. (added an indefinite article) – Bunch Jan 15 '15 at 8:25
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    That is technically fine, I think, but study habits are almost always pluralized. – jgritty Jan 15 '15 at 8:30
  • books.google.com/ngrams/… – jgritty Jan 15 '15 at 8:31
  • Ohhh, thanks a lot. And the link is very useuful, Will be great help me a lot from now on! – Bunch Jan 15 '15 at 8:37
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Uh1. It's stupid of you to do it. It seems natural and grammatically correct.

  1. He has no house to live. It's grammatically correct. It's also correct to say that he has no house to live in.

  2. She left her village never to return. It's also OK, though I prefer to put a comma before never.

  3. The box is light enough for him to carry. If we use a noun for enough, the noun comes after enough. However, an adjective comes before enough. in the sentence, "light" is an adjective. The sentence is OK.

  4. I think she has good study habit. There must be the indefinite article "a" before good (I think she has a good study habit). However, we can also say she has good study habits, which is more natural. So it's sentence #5 that is incorrect as it doesn't have the indefinite article "a".

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    #2 is ungrammatical. He has no pot to piss? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 15 '15 at 11:20
  • @TRomono, No, it's not ungrammatical. He has no house to live is also correct. It means he has no house for the purpose of living. Can you justify your contention by giving a reliable reference. By the way, what do you say about the following sentences: They have found a place to live (Longman). This is a nice place to live (The Free Dictionary). – Khan Jan 16 '15 at 6:26
  • I am not sure where to find a reference, but as a native speaker, I agree with @TRomano: "They have found a place to live" sounds fine but "They have found a house to live" sounds wrong. – Nate Eldredge Jan 16 '15 at 6:43
  • “This is a nice place to live” is grammatically correct, but “This is a nice house to live” is not. In English grammar, phrases rather than individual words are sometimes primary, and with some phrases, you can’t replace a word by its synonym. (Native AmE. Here's a reference. Also, please see my answer here for a little more about why replacing a word with a synonym can make a sentence ungrammatical.) – Ben Kovitz Jan 16 '15 at 6:47
  • @TRomano/Nate Eldredge/Ben Kovitz, thanks. I am convinced. – Khan Jan 16 '15 at 9:53

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