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It would be great if someone explained to me the difference of the following sentences:

  • Tell me some things about yourself.
  • Tell me some things for yourself.

If you explained the general difference in usage, it would be even better.

This may sound like a stupid question but in my mother tongue we use different prepositions. Thanks

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    about yourself means with regard to yourself. On the other hand, for yourself means for your benefit. Depending on the context, for yourself may also mean by yourself, without others' help – JayHook Jan 16 '15 at 13:06
  • We usually ask for differences in things that are, sometimes seemingly, similar, either in meaning, or usage. I can't imagine how would anyone think that "about" and "for" can be the same. – M.A.R. Jan 16 '15 at 17:30
  • As I said in my description, my mother tongue has different preposition, and they are used differently. – Fokos Jan 17 '15 at 8:44
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Prepositions are often one of the trickiest parts of a new language.

"About" means "near" or "on the subject of" or "related to". "Tell me something about yourself" means "tell me things that are relevant to you" or "tell me things that are related to you".

"For" refers to intention, or purpose. If something is "for you", that means that you are its intended recipient or beneficiary. If I cook "for you", that means I cook a meal so that you can eat it.

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    ... or I cook a meal for you means I cook a meal instead of you because you cannot. – Adam Jan 22 '15 at 22:19
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    Yes! "For you" can also mean "on your behalf". "Bob came by to ask you a question. You weren't here, so I answered for you." – Stephen Dunscombe Jan 22 '15 at 22:23
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    Exactly. And "say something for yourself" means say something on your own behalf. Usually like this "Don't you have anything to say for yourself?" meaning in your own defense, if accused of something – Brian Hitchcock Jan 23 '15 at 10:00

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