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I have encountered a question related to wish clauses. According to the answer key, the answer must be like this

I wish you had not bought a camera already as my cousin works in a camera shop and can get up to twenty-five percent staff discount.

But if it is used this way, there is no regret. Do you think that the following sentence more accurate than the above?

I wish you had not bought a camera. As working in a camera shop, my cousin could have got up to twenty-five percent staff discount.

  • @StoneyB sorry, you're right – mustafa Jan 20 '15 at 22:38
  • Side note: The correct grammar would be, "As he works in a camera shop, my cousin could have gotten up to a twenty-five percent staff discount." – Jay Jan 20 '15 at 22:52
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    It's not clear to me why you think the second example is superior. It looks like you've just broken one sentence into two. Can you clarify why you think that's better? – Jay Jan 20 '15 at 23:02
  • when it is said "I wish you had not bought a camera", we understand the action finished.but the first one continues ".. my cousin can get up to twenty-five percent staff discount (now)". I mean there is no regret in this usage. Namely, the first one doesn't contain the meaning at which "if you hadn't bought the camera, my cousin would buy it for less" – mustafa Jan 20 '15 at 23:32
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    "could have gotten you a discount" would be best, since the cousin "can get a discount" always, but now that the purchase has been made, it is too late for him to get you a discount. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 20 '15 at 23:37
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Honestly, I think both of the sentences sound a bit clunky... The use of as is very odd... not saying it's incorrect but I don't think, as a native AmE speaker, I would ever use it that way.

My most likely way of saying this is:

I wish you hadn't bought a camera. My cousin works in a camera shop and could have gotten you a 25% discount.

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I wish you hadn't bought a camera already as my cousin works in a camera shop and can get up to 25% staff discount.

The OP thinks that there is no element of regret in this sentence, which isn't correct. When you use "wish" in the subjunctive mood, it means that you want something to happen or to be true although it's unlikely or impossible. In other words, it means that you feel sorry or sad about a state or situation that exists in the present or was in the past (Cambridge).

So whether you use wish in one sentence as mentioned above or split it into two parts as follows, the element of regret is always there:

I wish you had not bought a camera. As my cousin works in a camera shop, he could have gotten (AE)/got (BE) up to 25% staff discount.

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