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Here's a quote from the article of COMPUTERWORLD: http://www.computerworld.com/article/2825116/free-at-last-after-windows-10-consumers-wont-pay-for-updates-or-upgrades.html

The two put Microsoft's Windows 10 and Microsoft's promise of a steady stream of updates in context for businesses, which have shied away from Windows 8 and are being coaxed back into the fold with promises that Windows 10 will be all that its predecessor wasn't.

I don't understand the meaning of this sentence. For example, what does it mean "putting something in context"? and what does it mean "being coaxed back into the fold"?

Would you please rephrase it in plain English?

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The two put Microsoft's Windows 10 and Microsoft's promise of a steady stream of updates in context for businesses, which have shied away from Windows 8 and are being coaxed back into the fold with promises that Windows 10 will be all that its predecessor wasn't.

"The two" refers to two people, Silver and Kleynhans, who are mentioned earlier in the article.

Putting something in context means that you show the bigger picture into which something fits, and in this case, it specifically means that they show what something really means.

The whole parts after businesses, ... refers to those businesses, about which the author mentions a number of things.

A tentative rewrite would be:

In the presentation that was just mentioned, Silver and Kleynhans explain to businesses what some things mean for them.
The two things they explain are Microsoft's Windows 10 and Microsoft's promise of a steady stream of updates.
Those businesses didn't want to get Windows 8.
Microsoft tries to convince those businesses to come back to Windows.
Microsoft promises that Windows 10 will be all that its predecessor wasn't.

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    Easy to say when its predecessor, Windows 9, does not even exist! – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 22 '15 at 13:52
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    @TRomano: they have a history of that. Ever seen Windows 94, 97, 1999 or 6? – oerkelens Jan 22 '15 at 14:41
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    Those versions must have been too stable for release, threatening the sales of future versions. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 22 '15 at 16:32
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Just to add to oerkelens's excellent answer.

Coaxed back into the fold

means to be encouraged to join the "group" that [someone has (probably recently) left].

The origin of this expression is that a fold refers to a container of animals or livestock (domesticated animals, such as cattle, sheep etc). An example of a fold is a pen, or enclosure, for sheep or other domestic animals.

So, an animal that was in the enclosure, but (somehow) escaped, has been brought back into the same enclosure.

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