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TSF = Target Security Functions. (Security Functions of the Target)

FDP_ITC.2.3/Installer :

The TSF shall ensure that the protocol used provides for the unambiguous association between the security attributes and the user data received.

Above, you see a part of JCOP V2.4.2 R3 Security Target (Source here).

I can't understand it!

Why it is written like this!? Is it written correct? Shouldn't he/she put a "That is" between words in "protocol used" and also between words in "user data received"

I mean, does the above sentence mean like this :

The TSF shall ensure that it (TSF itself) provides the protocol that is used for the unambiguous association between the security attributes and the user data that is received

Is it right?

  • You've missed the verb provides – CowperKettle Jan 25 '15 at 7:23
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Yes, this text is ok. Let me break it down:

The TSF shall ensure
[that the protocol used
{provides for the unambiguous association between
(the security attributes) and (the user data received).}]

So there exists a protocol (You could also write "the used protocol" instead of "the protocol used"), that is supposed to connect two things. The TSF must make sure that the choosen protocol does his job.

  • So "the user data received" mean "(the data of the user) that is received"? – TheGoodUser Jan 25 '15 at 7:38
  • {provides for the unambiguous association between (the security attributes) and (the user data received).} Provides what? – TheGoodUser Jan 25 '15 at 7:39
  • Yup. same pattern as "protocol used". Often used in these technical papers. – Stephie Jan 25 '15 at 7:40
  • My dictionary said, the verb "provide" has a form like this "provide something for someone/something". and in this question the used form is like this "provides for .... ". So I think it needs something to provide. Am I right? – TheGoodUser Jan 25 '15 at 7:47
  • very rough transcript: the protocol "makes" or "supplies" the association between a. and b. – Stephie Jan 25 '15 at 8:12
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Your breakdown at the end of your question is correct. The omission of "that" is quite common in English.

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