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I felt like I was taking one step forward and two step back because for every sentence I understood, there would be two that I'd get completely mixed up.

Could you re-organize this sentence? I have no idea what the main subject and verb is from the part 'because ~'. I would really appreciate it if you could help me get out of a tight spot.

  • "[...] because there would be two sentences that I'd get completely mixed up for every sentence I undestood." – eyam Jan 30 '15 at 9:06
  • Do you want to understand the meaning, or do you need to determine where the main verb/subject are in the part following "because"? – CowperKettle Jan 30 '15 at 9:09
  • For every sentence I understood, there would be two meanings, and I would get these two completely mixed up. Am I right? @CopperKettle ,@eyam – jihoon Jan 30 '15 at 9:29
  • @jihoon : nope. Among 3 setences there is one sentence I understand, and two sentences I don't. "For every [something] there is [something else]". Another example : "For every computer there is a mouse, a screen and a keyboard". – eyam Jan 30 '15 at 11:23
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The speaker is depressed.

I felt like taking one step forward and two steps back.

The meaning for this part, you seem to have fully understood.

For every sentence I understood, there would be two that I'd get completely mixed up.

Imagine that you have to face 100 questions in an important exam you have to take. First question is really easy: "Phew". You answer it like eating a cake. But the second and the third questions aren't the ones you're going to be able to answer. You skip them. You are able to answer the fourth one, but "fifth and sixth are again 'impossible' to answer." You think.

The trend goes on like this. You answer one question, but are unable to answer the other two. So, out of three questions asked, you can answer one (or at least understand it) but you can't answer the other two.

The speaker isn't talking about a "mold". S\he is talking about a whole language, for instance. If s\he isn't able to understand two out of three sentences, s\he knows this as a setback.

From a more linguistic point of view, the structure after "because" can be used to describe relativity (this isn't the only usage for it; it's mainly used for a bigger purposes, but this is a division of that usage):

For every apple tree in the garden, the gardener planted five new orange saplings.

Generally, you can use this structure (that relies on "for" meaning) for consequences of repeated actions:

For every misfire, the soldier was put for dish-washing duty for three days.

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"There would be two sentences that I would get completely mixed up for every sentence that I understood." = "I understood half the number of sentences that I did not understand."

In summary: "I did not understand most sentences."

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