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there~ I hope you could help me with these^^

I haven`t learned it for one year.

I haven`t learned it in a year.

What is the differece??

I haven`t practiced playing basketball for one year.

I haven`t practiced playing basketball in a year.

What is the differece??

Actually, the original sentence I heard is "I haven`t had sex in a year."

I haven`t had sex for one year.

I haven`t had sex in a year.

What is the differece??

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    But be careful, your examples with learned aren't quite the same. It's fortunate you added your original sentence to the question. learned is different because it describes a process leading to a culminating point. So saying you haven't learned it in a year is not quite semantically correct- perhaps I haven't studied it for a year would be better. And I haven't learned it in a year means that after spending a year trying to learn it, you still were not successful. But this is peculiar to learn and doesn't apply to the other verbs on your question.
    – Jim
    Jan 30 '15 at 15:25
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    Oops, I just noticed I used in in place of for in my first example. I meant, "saying you haven't learned it for a year" isn't quite semantically correct...
    – Jim
    Jan 30 '15 at 19:17
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I haven't learned it for one year.

I haven't learned it in a year.

These sentences can be different! The first always means that you haven't learned it during the past year, but did before. The second could also have this meaning with proper context, but would more likely be used to mean that you have been trying to learn it for a year, but aren't done.

I haven't practiced playing basketball for one year.

I haven't practiced playing basketball in a year.

These sentences have the same meaning, that you haven't practiced playing basketball at any time during the past year, but did before that.

I haven't had sex for one year.

I haven't had sex in a year.

These sentences have the same meaning, as above.

The difference in the example about learning is that learning is a process that can be completed, so in takes on a different meaning.

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Both set of sentences are correct and bear the same meaning.

The choice between in and for in your sentences is not decided by correctness but by region. The sentences with in is common in AmE, whereas the sentences with for is common in BrE.


Both for and in can be used to talk about time.

For

(preposition) we use for to say how long something lasts or continues.

Example

The toaster remained on for more than an hour.

For a few minutes she sat and on her bed watching the clock.

They talked for a bit.

In

(preposition) If you do something in a particular period or time, that is how long it takes you to do it.

Example

He walked two hundred and sixty miles in eight days.

(preposition) We can also use in for a time in the future measured from the present.

Example

Ella takes her exam in three weeks/in three weeks' time.

Note 1

You can walk there in half an hour (= you need half an hour)

I'm going out in half an hour (= half an hour from now)

After a negative we can use for and in with the same meaning. In is particularly common in American English:

I haven’t seen him in five years. (or for five years.)

Note 2

Compare the following sentences.

We’re going to Cape Town for two months. (= We will spend two months in Cape Town.)

We’re going to Cape Town in two months. (= We’re leaving to go to Cape Town two months from now.)

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I haven't had sex for one year.

I haven't had sex in a year.

While these have almost the same meaning, to me, the first (one) reads more precise and second (a) reads more approximate (about a year).

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"Learned" describes a completed action. Therefore, neither of these sentences makes good sense (and note that I have replaced your backquotes with apostrophes):

I haven't learned it for one year.
I haven't learned it in a year.

Reasonable expressions include:

  • I haven't taken piano lessons in a year.
  • I learned how to ride a bicycle over a year ago.
  • I haven't learned anything new about iOS since I switched to Android last year.
  • I failed to learn geometry last year, so I have to repeat the course.

I don't believe that there is any difference between this pair:

I haven't practiced playing basketball for one year.
I haven`t practiced playing basketball in a year.


I haven't had sex in a year is a neutral expression.

I haven't had sex for one year could have a connotation that you are deliberately abstaining from sex, and so far you have attained a year-long streak. It doesn't necessarily have to be interpreted that way, though.

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I haven't __ in a year.

means

For the past year, I haven't __.

They're the same thing.

Once you switch out "a" for "one", it makes it sound like you're providing exact data on the length of time, whereas you might have been approximating when you said "in a year"--as Paul Senzee points out.

That's a minor point, though. Essentially the meaning is still the same.

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