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I co-manage a PtokaX based DC++ hub in my college.(Only relevant if you know what DC++ and hubs are) We had a script which registered a bot named Infobot to the hub. Since, those scripts were getting slower because of very bad programming skills and also, I had some newer features to implement, I rewrote the entire script and created another bot with the name [BOT]Info.

The prefix [BOT] is to maintain uniformity across a wide list of users. Now, to inform all the users about this change, I am mentioning:

Infobot has been deprecated. | Comments welcome at <forum link here>

My question is, am I correct in using the word deprecated here? Or should I instead be using replaced as follows:

[BOT]Info has replaced Infobot. | Comments...

as the older script has been deleted. In my opinion, I'd be using the word deprecated when I'm telling about this change to another co-managers of the hub(?) and replaced should be preferred word.

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Deprecated means that it is still available for use but it is recommended to use the newer functionality. Deprecated functionality is typically removed after an adequate period of time.

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You can also write :

Infobot is moved to [BOT]Info.|Comments....

OR

Infobot has been moved to [BOT]Info.|Comments....

  • The thing with moved to in reference to bots is that they both shared same commands/features. I have introduced a lot of newer commands. Would using moved to still be applicable? – hjpotter92 Apr 2 '13 at 4:18
  • @hjpotter92: Jim's comment has already covered your question (if the older bot can still be used, it's deprecated; if it can't, you've replaced it). Where you "put" these bots, and what terms you might use to describe their "placement", are really a separate question. – FumbleFingers Apr 2 '13 at 4:35
  • @FumbleFingers Oh, I missed the comment. Clicked on the answers notification in inbox. – hjpotter92 Apr 2 '13 at 4:37

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