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Do the two paragraphs below mean the same thing, assuming that having being said to is the passive of somebody said to you

Having being said to that you are becoming a mother while you are at your husband birthday party would be a great thing.

In my opinion, it is a great thing if somebody, no matter who, ( it could be your mother in law, a friend or an stranger that has just read your blood test ) tells you at your husband birthday oarty that you are becoming a mother.

  • Having being said to that… is ungrammatical. Can you double-check your source to be sure you've transcribed it correctly? – Ben Kovitz Feb 1 '15 at 15:28
  • Actually this is my original sentence. And what is the correct thing to mean the same thing in sentence number two. Thanks in advance. – user5036 Feb 1 '15 at 15:34
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    Now I understand. I just posted an answer that shows some different verb constructions that mean the same thing. – Ben Kovitz Feb 1 '15 at 15:45
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These sentences all mean the same thing, and they use different constructions for same act of being told:

(1) Being told that you are becoming a mother while you are at your husband's birthday party would be a great thing.

(2) It would be a great thing if somebody tells you at your husband's birthday party that you are becoming a mother.

(3) It would be great to be told at your husband's birthday party that you are becoming a mother.

(4) It would be great were someone to tell you at your husband's birthday party that you are becoming a mother.

(5) It would be great if someone would tell you at your husband's birthday party that you are becoming a mother.

If you think knowing the terminology for these would be useful, read on: (1) uses a gerund and the passive voice, (2) uses the active voice and the present tense (within an if clause), (3) uses a passive infinitive, (4) uses the active voice, the subjunctive mood in the past tense (though this is debatable), and an infinitive, and (5) uses the conditional mood.

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