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I have been trying to translate an article about wearable smart watches. The meaning of "shortage" in the text below is unclear to me: Does it mean lack of quantity or lack of quality or lack of facilities ?

There is no shortage of wearable gear out there, and really what I’m writing about here is the latest crop of smartwatches, most of which run on Android Wear. In the grand scheme, I know it is but a portion of what many of us may use, be it Jawbone’s UP, or Fitbit, or Samsung’s Tizen powered Galaxy Gear, and for me, it really comes down to a single issue. As I thought about that single issue though, I examined other factors that leave me feeling pensive about what lies ahead.

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    here, it's lack of quantity. Shortage is an economic term that indicates that there isn't enough supply to meet the demand at a particular price. – Jim Feb 1 '15 at 19:43
  • Or possibly lack of options – Adam Feb 1 '15 at 19:44
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    @Adam is correct as well. In this context it's saying that there are many different types of wearable gear out there=- I.e., there is a large quantity of wearables out there. – Jim Feb 1 '15 at 19:46
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As an avid reader of technology articles, I strongly agree with Adam and disagree with Jim. The statement "There is no shortage of" can be clarified by assuming the context of the writer.

As a writer on smartwatches, the writer has familiarity with the assortment of options available. I would assume that the writer is a reviewer, meaning he/she is writing about smartwatches based on his/her hands-on experience with each of these. I instantly visualized the writer (as I tend to do) surrounded at a desk by an assortment of smartwatches...

With this in mind, it's clear that the "shortage" refers to the variety of smartwatches available for purchase, unless there's something else to the article talking about the quality and/or facilities related to smartwatches.

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The negation makes it irrelevant: There is ample quantity, quality, and facilities, as applicable. No matter what you're looking for in wearable gear, it's out there.

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