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Source: Book 1, Lines 257-260, The Odyssey, by Homer, translated by Robert Fitzgerald

Then grey-eyed Athena said:
“The gods decreed no lack of honor in this generation: such is the son Penélopê bore in you.

As per this, such here functions as a pronoun denoting the italicised. To illustrate my issue, I rewrite the main clause after the colon, firstly by reordering it into SVO sentence structure:

1. = the son Penélopê bore in you is such.

2. = the son Penélopê bore in you is no lack of honor in this generation.

3. the son Penélopê bore in you HAS no lack of honor in this generation

Yet 2 is wrong, because 'to be' cannot be followed by a noun phrase. So should the bolded instead be 'such HAS', which when rearranged into SVO, matches with 3?

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    Such = of that ilk – Tᴚoɯɐuo Feb 3 '15 at 19:20
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The gods decreed no lack of honor in this generation: such is the son Penélopê bore in you.

Why do you think such should be literally transplanted with the piece of text it refers back to?

The son Penelope bore in you is such that he has no lack of honor, just as the gods decreed any person born in this generation would be.

or

The son Penelope has in your person is brave. This fits perfectly with the gods' decree that any person born in this generation would be brave.

or

Well, I see Penelope has a brave man for a son! Just like the gods' decreed for this generation.

Such could be roughly interpreted as not lacking honor, or simply speaking brave.

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