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Hi I know this is vulgar language but since it is a part of English I want to learn in right way. I want to ask a question about cum and come and this is really serious question made me confused.

I read people say "I am coming" in sexual meaning. But is it proper English or it is a just joke?

I want to ask, just before you are going to ejaculate do you say "I am coming" or "I am cumming"? Is come used in sexual meaning really or it is just word-play because they sound the same.

and I want to ask how do you say how many times you ejaculated at a night while you are having sex?

I came three time last night or I cummed three times last night.

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    Come in the orgasmic sense declines the same as in any other sense: come, came, have come. The spelling with um is eye dialect, recently discussed here. – StoneyB Feb 7 '15 at 12:46
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People use both come and cum as a verb to mean the experience of having an orgasm, and/or ejaculating, whether ejaculating means secreting semen from a male or (controversially) any fluid that may be secreted from a female, at orgasm; and as a noun meaning semen or (controversially) any fluid that may be secreted from a female during orgasm.

Some forms of these verbs are:

will cum, will come, cummed, came, is cumming, is coming, have cum, have come

Because only a few of the standard recognized resources (dictionaries) describe these words in detail, and because they are generally considered by such as slang, we may not have a great deal of "authoritative" guidance in their spellings and usages.

Some people will say that the words are part of proper or standard English, because many people use those words to have those meanings. Some people say they are vulgar or slang, or both.

People say I'm coming or I'm cumming just before orgasm to mean "I am going to (or starting to) have an orgasm," and people can say it seriously, with humor, with passion, as a joke, or in all kinds of ways, just as with most phrases or words. But no, it's not "just a joke."

To enumerate how many times last night, I have only heard or read expressions like I came x times last night and How many times did you come/cum last night? It seems to me that cummed is less often used.

The American Heritage Dictionary defines come but not cum as a verb:

  1. Vulgar Slang To experience orgasm.

And come "Also cum" has only one definition as a noun:

n. also cum (kŭm)
Vulgar Slang
Semen ejaculated during orgasm.

And the same dictionary lists cum only as a noun, labeling it a "variant of come", suggesting that "come" may be the more standard or common term:

n.
Vulgar Slang

Variant of come.

With the last line above apparently linking to come in the noun sense, meaning semen.

TFD's Thesaurus lists both come and cum as nouns, e.g.:

Noun 1. cum - the thick white fluid containing spermatozoa that is ejaculated by the male genital tractcum - the thick white fluid containing spermatozoa that is ejaculated by the male genital tract come, ejaculate, semen, seminal fluid, seed

but only come as a verb, semantically tied to "experience; go through":

  1. come - experience orgasm; "she could not come because she was too upset".
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    "she could not come because she was too upset" is a super bizarre sentence. – user3306356 Feb 7 '15 at 15:06
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    I searched the Corpus of Contemporary American English to find something more mundane for you. How's this: MICHELLE: Yeah. She couldn't come. RIVERA: But what happened? MICHELLE: She couldn't come. RIVERA: She couldn't come because of... MICHELLE: Yeah. I'd rather not say. She just couldn't come. RIVERA: Did Mommy and Daddy have something to do with that? MICHELLE: No. RIVERA: Oh, no? MICHELLE: No, no. No. RIVERA: Oh, OK. Source information: . Date 1992 (19920817) Title INTERRACIAL COUPLES COMMENT ON THEIR PROBLEMS WITH THEIR FAMILIES Source Ind_Geraldo – Jim Reynolds Feb 7 '15 at 15:30
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    I think "cummed" is typically used -- at least, in the pr0n I've read -- only in the sense of putting ejaculate onto something. "He cummed all over the bed." It's kind of awkward, though, and I wouldn't blink at "He came all over the bed." For expression of orgasm (rather than detailing the associated fluids), I would expect to see the construction of "I came three times last night" (rather than "cummed") in most reasonably literate explicit material. ...I may not be a porn connoisseur, though. – A.Beth Feb 7 '15 at 21:50
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I've just read etymonline. The author says "cum" is a variant of "come". http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=Cum

I read etymonline because I had the idea there might be a connection between "cum" and French écume, meaning foam. But etymonline does not mention such a possibility.

protected by snailboat Nov 13 '16 at 15:22

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