3

Let's say the context is a guy and and girl at a restaurant. Then, they had an argument. Then, the girl picked up a glass of beverage (full) and then made one jerking movement of the glass at the guy, causing the content of the glass to leave the glass and hit the guy in the face. The glass itself never left the girl's hand. I came up with two possible sentences to describe the situation:

  1. She splashed the drink at him.
  2. She threw the drink at him.

I have a feeling that "throw" is not the correct verb to use, since there was no overhead movement of the arm. Am I wrong?

  • 2
    Overhead movement of the arm? There's nothing wrong with throwing sidearm. – J.R. Feb 9 '15 at 10:00
  • @J.R. is right, in that you can throw sidearm or underhand; nothing about "throw" implies overhead. Also don't forget that "throw" is a verb with many modal and metaphorical uses: you can throw up, throw out, throw away, throw down, throw in the towel, throw around an idea; something can be a throwback or an overthrow...so the meaning of "throw" can be very fluid! – stangdon Feb 9 '15 at 15:05
2

For liquid (especially drink/water), it's 'splash'. I mean that is the word!

A typical example on OALD

He splashed cold water on his face.

On NBCMiami I found that Miss Universe contestants splashed water at the photographer.

'Throw water' looks a bit off to me.


Good thing to know: throw water is possible but then, it becomes a part of an idiom.

Throw cold water on something - to criticize or stop something that some people are enthusiastic about

1

You could use throw, but it's more ambiguous. If someone "throws a drink" at me, it's not clear if it's merely the contents of the glass that are thrown, or if the glass is thrown, too. But surrounding context could clarify that:

We argued for some time, and then I called her a moron, and that really made her angry. She picked up her drink and threw it at me! My shirt got soaked, and the olive hit me right in the forehead. Then she slammed the glass back down on the table and stomped out of the restaurant. All eyes were on me, so I sheepishly said, "It's just like her to leave me with the check."

or, if the glass did leave her hand:

We argued for some time, and then I called her a moron, and that really made her angry. She picked up her drink and threw it at me! Luckily, I ducked. My shirt got a little wet, but the glass made it all the way to the wall – I was surprised it didn't break. Then she stomped out of the restaurant. All eyes were on me, so I picked up the glass and sheepishly said, "Good thing she throws like a girl."

0

She dashed her drink in his face. A modern usage with video:

Members of XXXX's entourage shoved Ms YYYYY to the floor, and a drink was dashed in her friend ZZZZZ ZZZZ-ZZZZ's face in the melee, drawing bouncers to the scene.

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