6

Those who are living in apartments, sometimes may have to experience much decorating noise coming from their neighbors.

The definitions below are cited from Cambridge dictionary:

Experience - If you experience something, it happens to you, or you feel it.
Go through - to experience a difficult or unpleasant situation.
Undergo - to experience something that is unpleasant or something that involves a change.

So I think it is fine to either use "undergo" or "go through" to replace "experience" in above sentence, but are there any subtle differences to use these alternatives?

  • This is an interesting question; I'm tempted to upvote it. It would've been much better, though, had you looked up these three words in a dictionary (perhaps you did, there's no way to know), and then included those definitions in your question (which you didn't). I have a hunch about how I'd use these three words, but I wouldn't want to leave incorrect information, and I don't have time to look them up right now. Moreover, I wouldn't want to waste time repeating what you already know. Have a look at how this user asked a similar question. – J.R. Apr 4 '13 at 10:21
  • All right, it is a good idea to include their definitions here. Done. – canoe Apr 4 '13 at 13:06
7

Those who are living in apartments sometimes may have to experience much decorating noise coming from their neighbors.

It's sometimes because the experience is expected to happen at various times. Sometime would be used for a single instance

I will go to the store sometime today.

Undergo is OK to use here, but it infers a negative or difficult experience.

He has to undergo a difficult operation.

All new recruits are required to undergo a physical examination.

Go through is more likely used related to a specific occurrence, so its not a good choice for your example.

He had to go through the training program before he could be hired.

I like

Those who are living in apartments sometimes may have to endure a lot of decorating noise coming from their neighbors.

The definition of endure sense 2 (to put up with; tolerate) fits the meaning in your example.

I'm not sure if its wrong, but much doesn't sound right in your statement. I prefer a lot of.

|improve this answer|||||
  • +1 for "endure". (The bridge over the creek next to my office is being demolished and rebuilt; it is expected to take 10 months, and most of the time it will be noisy. Endurance is surely what is needed.) – barbara beeton Apr 5 '13 at 20:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.