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If Country exists, if Country is a natural necessity like bread, of which each of us must eat in order not to die of hunger, somebody must go to defend it.

Would you please show me if the bold parts mean the same thing?

each of us of which

What is more, could you teach me other possible ways to write the following part?

of which each of which

Thanks in advance

Updated:

In order to avoid ambiguity as to why I have raised the question, the following might be useful:

The bungalow, of which the roofs was damaged, had to be corrected.

The bungalow, the roofs of which was damaged, had to be corrected.

enter link description here

  • A minor note: roof is usually singular. One bungalow has one roof, not roofs. – stangdon Feb 11 '15 at 12:14
  • I have a feeling that I have seen this kind of question here. And there the OP had shared some link about this kind of usage. Just can't find it :-( – Man_From_India Feb 11 '15 at 16:08
  • Both The bungalow, of which the roofs was damaged, had to be corrected and The bungalow, the roofs of which was damaged, had to be corrected are correct but these sentence are not similar to the sentence where of which each of us occurs. The difference is that the roof is attached with the antecedent, but each of us is not attached wit the antecedent. – Man_From_India Feb 11 '15 at 16:28
  • Oh my mistake in my previous comment. As @stangdon said, I should have used roof instead of roofs. I just copy pasted those sentences without much attention on that word :-( – Man_From_India Feb 12 '15 at 3:11
2

This example is somewhat archaic; I would not expect to find it in modern English prose. The key to understanding is that it was and is common to say that one "eats bread" but it used to be also common to say that one "eats OF bread", meaning the same thing.

we must eat OF bread so, bread is something OF WHICH we must eat

How many of us eat? Each of us!

Thus: ". . .bread, of which each of us must eat. . ."

1

Each of us of which

This isn't sensible to use or to hear, at least in this context.

...of which each of us...

"Which" is a pronoun that has begun a relative clause. There is also this rule of grammar, which I believe you know, that a preposition is best to come before the relative pronoun if necessary for the main element of the clause. "Each of us" is the subject of a this sentence:

Each of us must eat in order not to die of hunger.

So I really don't get why one would think about writing the latter phrase you emboldened.

1

I have listed down some ways to use of which form:

The house whose roof was damaged is said to be haunted.

Here the antecedent of whose is house - an inanimate object. We can replace whose in these cases with of which.

The house of which the roof was damaged is said to be haunted.

The other way of saying it -

The house the roof of which was damaged is said to be haunted.

Other examples -

There are few questions the answer of which I don't know.

There are few questions of which I don't know the answer.

There are few questions which I don't know the answer of.

But the following sentence is ungrammatical and hence not accepted.

  • He came up with a strange plan which the purpose of escapes me. (INCORRECT)

Partitive examples -

She hadn't kept copies of her letters, only five of which he had answered.

She hadn't kept copies of her letters, of which he had answered only five.

But the following is wrong -

  • She hadn't kept copies of her letters, which he hadn't answered only five of (INCORRECT)

The following links are useful

  1. Link 1

  2. Link 2

  3. Link 3

  • A.There are few questions which I don't know the answer of.B.She hadn't kept copies of her letters, which he hadn't answered only five of I am wondering why A is correct but B is incorrect!! – nima Feb 11 '15 at 18:49
  • @nima A good question. Even I don't know the reason. But it's this way. A learner should at least know that when a quantity is involved such as in sentence #B that construction is not allowed. We can't move the preposition at the end that way. – Man_From_India Feb 12 '15 at 3:01

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