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People whose health (has taken / takes) a turn to for the worse should not drink.

Personally I think it is more suitable to use 'has taken' because this means that the people are ill or unhealthy now, so they need to go to the doctor and get medicine, not to drink. However if I used 'takes', it would be awkward and I don't know why.

If I used 'takes', what happens?

people who (are feeling / feel) slightly under the weather with a cold should not drink.

I think both of them are right. because present tense can describe the idea that an action is happening now and present continuous tense can also deliver that meaning too.

Are there any subtle differences between 'are feeling' and 'feel' in this sentence?

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    Please write descriptive titles. – M.A.R. Feb 11 '15 at 13:47
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    It's take a turn for the worse (148,000 results in Google Books), not take a turn to the worse (just 8 results). – FumbleFingers Feb 11 '15 at 14:03
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    took and feel are the best options, in my opinion. – Man_From_India Feb 11 '15 at 14:43
  • @Man_From_India Took sounds odd to me, honestly. – Catija Feb 11 '15 at 14:56
  • @Catija I am not a native speaker. But I judge is grammatically. I see it this way. By has taken I see that the process of turning is still on, but using took mean the process of turning is complete. And so took seems better to me. – Man_From_India Feb 11 '15 at 14:59
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These are two phrases with two different meanings and which you use should be based on what you're trying to say:

People whose health has taken a turn for the worse should not drink.

This is past tense. Your health has already gotten worse, so you should not drink.

People whose health takes a turn for the worse should not drink.

I don't know the technical part of speech, but this is a future possibility. If, in the future, your health gets worse, you should not drink.


For feel/are feeling, there is little difference. I think are feeling sounds a bit more active.

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People whose health takes a turn for the worse should not drink.

There's nothing wrong with this sentence, but since takes is in the present tense, you are implying there is a presently occurring event that can suddenly change the health of people, which is very scary.

People whose health have taken a turn for the worse should not drink.

This fits in the rules of present perfect outlined here, namely:

You can use the Present Perfect to describe your experience. It is like saying, "I have the experience of..." You can also use this tense to say that you have never had a certain experience. The Present Perfect is NOT used to describe a specific event.


People who feel slightly under the weather with a cold should not drink.

People who are feeling slightly under the weather with a cold should not drink.

The second sentence is present continuous and can refer to long events happening now, such as "feeling slightly under the weather." Plain old present tense is not that specific. So it's not a big difference in meaning and probably doesn't matter, but it would be more appropriate to say "are feeling" if you are talking to a newly arrived group and they could at that time be feeling under the weather. The first sentence sounds like you are warning people who have not yet arrived to somewhere.

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