1

Here is a sentence I'd like to transform to make sure I know how to use this kind of pattern more freely.

This feature of 4D movies makes you feel like you are not just watching movies but also like you are part of it yourself.

Here's one I've reorganized.

This feature of 4D movies makes you feel like you are part of it yourself not just like you are watching movies.

How would you reorganize the original sentence? And am I right to do this?

2

Neither sentence is idiomatic--close, but not quite.

This feature of 4D movies makes you feel like you are not just watching movies but also like you are part of it yourself.

This feature of 4D movies makes you feel like you are part of it yourself not just like you are watching movies.

Not just ... but also not OK. "Also" does not belong.

This feature of 4D movies makes you feel like you are not just watching a movie but like you are part of the movie yourself.

Here, "just like" should be "just" without "like":

This feature of 4D movies makes you feel like you are part of the movie yourself, not just watching it.

There is also a minor issue with noun-pronoun agreement in your sentences.

1

Yep, you've got it.

The "not { just | only } [x] but also [y]" setup logically means "both [x] and [y] are true." Connotatively, it places a lot of emphasis on [y].

Although, just since you say you want to be able to use it more freely, I should mention that it's typically used in advertising, and not so commonly in day-to-day speech. At least not in the western United States, where I am.

It reminds me mostly of infomercials and dramatized movie trailers. There's certainly nothing wrong with that, but I'm not sure how natural it would really sound in a typical conversation.

Not only will I cut the price in half, but I'll also throw in a second one, free!

That usage has kind of made the setup sound a bit cheesy (second definition) to me, so I'd use it cautiously.

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