1

1.A vacation makes you stay more productive.

2.A vacation makes you more productive.

I know these 2 sentences are pretty much the same, but I'd like to know the subtle difference. For me, sentence 1 sounds like more natural because it is more obvious that 'you' is a subject of action or state 'stay more productive'. If you had to choose one favorite expression, what would you choose? And how about followings?

a. A vacation helps you stay more productive.

b. A vacation helps you more productive.

Thanks in advance.

  • I know these 2 sentences are pretty much the same.... Are they the same? I see one very different from the other! – M.A.R. Feb 15 '15 at 12:59
  • b) is ungrammatical. You need to add "be": A vacation helps you [to] be (or become) more productive. – Brian Hitchcock Feb 16 '15 at 6:32
1
  1. A vacation makes you stay more productive.
  2. A vacation makes you more productive.

If you had to choose one favorite expression, what would you choose?

This is a case where both expressions are grammatical, so we really need to be careful about getting into the business of choosing a "favorite." When two sentences are equally grammatical and neither is especially jarring, context determines when one might be chosen over the other.

For example, if I was writing an article entitled Ways to Become More Productive, then #2 might be a better fit. However, if the headline of my self-help article was, Ways to Remain Productive, then #1 might be a better fit.

As a footnote, if I was writing the article called Ways to Remain Productive, I might use the sentence structure in #2, but change the verb:

A vacation keeps you more productive.

  • Yes. "Make stay" doesn't sound 'desirable' to my ears too. – M.A.R. Feb 15 '15 at 12:58
1

You might "stay more" productive than someone else, but you cannot "stay more" productive than yourself.

A vacation can allow you to remain productive. Stay productive.

A vacation refreshes you. If your productivity has waned because of burn-out or job-weariness, a vacation can bring you back to your former level of productivity. So your productivity increases to its former level. Or a vacation can keep you from getting burnt-out.

In this process there is either a sense of change or becoming (recuperation) or of maintaining a level. Stay more makes no sense in either scenario: stay does not jibe with becoming, and more does not jibe with maintaining.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.