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This question already has an answer here:

"An opportunity for a complete positive transformation of your child for which you have always aspired for".

The above sentence appears on the board of a private primary school. I think the writer has made a redundancy in use of preposition. The sentence should correctly read as follows:

"An opportunity for a complete positive transformation of your child which you have always aspired for."

or:

"An opportunity for a complete positive transformation of your child for which you have always aspired."

marked as duplicate by user6951, Chenmunka, ColleenV, Tyler James Young, Ben Kovitz Feb 18 '15 at 16:23

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    Yes, you're right. You can use any of the sentences you wrote below. The one written on the school board is incorrect. – v kumar Feb 18 '15 at 11:02
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    Don't believe Indian private schools! Most of them commit blunders! :) – Maulik V Feb 18 '15 at 11:04
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You're absolutely right. I'm not sure if it breaks a formal grammatical rule, but it certainly sounds clumsy. I would even rewrite the sentence entirely:

An opportunity for a complete and positive transformation of your child that you've always aspired for.

Even then I dislike what it's saying; it implies that everyone's child is horrible and in dire need of a transformation that only the school can provide. That's just a personal thought though, and has no bearing on the validity of the sentence.

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