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It is very clear that the Employer’s fulfilling its obligations is a must for the performance of SAT4 test since it is impossible to carry out SAT4 activities without having IC and freight trains.

closed as off-topic by M.A.R., user3169, Jasper, Chenmunka, ColleenV Feb 20 '15 at 19:15

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  • Which sentence, the whole text in the body of the question? – user31782 Feb 20 '15 at 16:02
  • yes the whole text is a one sentence – discoversf Feb 20 '15 at 16:04
  • Even though I don't know what SAT4 and IC in your sentence are (particularly when you have "freight trains" in the same sentence), the best I can tell is it's grammatical. – Damkerng T. Feb 20 '15 at 16:08
  • Grammatically, true. Though the jargon confuses me a bit. Would be nice of you to provide a link to the reference. – M.A.R. Feb 20 '15 at 16:13
  • I don't know how you guys missed it or maybe I am over-thinking but I think there is a small grammatical error in the sentence. "Employer’s fulfilling its obligations" it must be either "Employer fulfilling its obligations" or "Employer’s fulfilling their obligations", all employers are treated as a single entity here in this sentence, so it is either Employer(singular) & its(singular) or Employer's(plural) & their(plural). – NANDAGOPAL Feb 20 '15 at 16:24
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While it is grammatically correct, it's a bit "clunky". I would suggest revising to:

It is very clear that the Employer must fulfill its obligations in order for the SAT4 test to be performed since it is impossible to carry out SAT4 activities without having IC and freight trains.

  • @Jasper good catch. Edited accordingly – Kevin Feb 20 '15 at 19:09
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Yes, it's grammatically correct.

The phrase "fulfilling its obligations" acts like a noun here, so imagine putting some other noun in its place and it will be more clear that the structure is fine.

Here's an example of that same sentence without all the phrases:

"It is clear that the employer's [clown] is a must for the performance of [balloon tricks] since it is impossible to carry out [balloon tricks] without [the balloons a clown would bring].

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