2

I have searched a lot on the Internet and it seems this sentence isn't a correct sentence. Even I've searched for sentences like:

  • If you want to get up at 7 tomorrow
  • If you want to wake up early tomorrow

and some other variations without any success. Would someone please explain to me what is wrong with this sentence and how I can correct it?

P.S: This is the situation. One of my friends has an interview tomorrow morning and I want to advise him to get up at 7.

P.S 2: I know that there should be a main-clause after the if-clause. Something like: if you want to get up at 7 tomorrow, you should go to bed at 10 today.

13
  • 3
    Could you please explain what you are trying to say? What you have so far is just half of a thought. It is not a full sentence.
    – Catija
    Feb 22, 2015 at 9:55
  • 3
    Just so you know, it's a clause, not a sentence. To form a complete sentence, you'd need to add more (for example, "If you want to wake up early tomorrow, be sure to set your alarm", or, "Jonas, if you want to get up at 7 tomorrow, make sure your phone is fully charged"). But there's nothing wrong with how your clause is worded.
    – J.R.
    Feb 22, 2015 at 9:56
  • 1
    Masoud - Maybe :-) At least now you know that "can't find on Google" ≠ "must be ungrammatical for some reason".
    – J.R.
    Feb 22, 2015 at 10:26
  • 2
    Do you use quote marks when you search? If you're looking for exact phrase matches, always put them in quotes: "if you want to get up". This search has over 14.5 million hits google.com/…
    – Catija
    Feb 22, 2015 at 10:28
  • 1
    Why would you care about at 7 specifically? It's not going to be any more or less grammatical than at 5 or at 10 or, more generally, early? There's no reason to include that in your phrase search. The word after up can be any of many different options.
    – Catija
    Feb 22, 2015 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

1

If you can't find something that you wrote on the internet, that could mean one of two things:

  1. You have written something so poorly and ungrammatical that it needs to be fixed.
  2. You have written something so original that you can't find your particular wording on the internet.

Not every valid sentence exists in cyberspace. This is a case where you've written something that's both grammatical and natural-sounding, yet, for some reason, people haven't blogged much about waking up at 7 o'clock – at least, not by using the same words you are using.

By the way, inserting an asterisk as a wildcard in your Google search can help. For example, when I tried searching for:

"if you want to get up at * tomorrow"

I found a few wordings. One was in an English exercise:

You'd better go to bed early tonight if you want to get up at 5 o'clock tomorrow.

The other was in a plan for a mountain hike:

We're meeting at 5:00am at the museum. So if you want to get up at 4:40 tomorrow morning then respond fast!

So, if you can't find a phrase like "If you want to get up at 7 tomorrow" on the internet, perhaps the time is the only thing wrong with your search.

1
  • Thank you for your detailed explanation. So that sentence isn't grammatically incorrect and it doesn't sound strange to a native speaker. And thanks for teaching me how to use * in google searches. I thought such a sentence should be a part of daily parents-children conversations so I was sure something is wrong with my sentence.
    – Masoud
    Feb 22, 2015 at 10:27
1

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the phrase "wake up at 7 tomorrow" or "if you want to wake up at 7 tomorrow, [then ...]". It sounds completely normal to me (native speaker of British English).

3
  • Thank you for your help. So it doesn't sound strange to you. Is it?
    – Masoud
    Feb 22, 2015 at 10:28
  • 1
    @Masoud - The only change I would make in your PS2 sentence would be changing today to tonight: If you want to get up at 7 tomorrow, you should go to bed at 10 tonight. (Your version is not ungrammatical, but I think tonight would fit better.)
    – J.R.
    Feb 22, 2015 at 10:44
  • @J.R. Did you mean to make that a comment to the question, rather than a comment to my answer? Feb 22, 2015 at 10:46

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .