1

Can I use an -ing clause in this case?

A and B complement each other well, A having an extensive knowledge in the biological side of the project while B being focused on the geographical aspects.

I hope it is clear what I am trying to say. A and B are scientists, one is a biologist and another is a geographer, so their collaboration is beneficial for the project.

1 Answer 1

2

While doesn't license participle clauses with explicit subjects, so you can't sustain that particular parallelism. But you're not required to; here are a couple of possible rewrites:

A and B complement each other well, A having an extensive knowledge of the biological side of the project while B focuses on the geographical aspects.

A and B complement each other well: A has an extensive knowledge of the biological side of the project while B focuses on the geographical aspects.

A and B complement each other well: A's extensive knowledge of the biological side of the project is paralleled by B's expertise in the geographical aspects.

2
  • Can I write 'and' instead of 'while' in the original sentence?
    – Sinusx
    Feb 23, 2015 at 13:11
  • @Sinusx Yes; but I would cut being as superfluous: "and B focused..." Feb 23, 2015 at 14:54

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .