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Here's a sentence that I'm not sure is right. And I have TWO questions

Even though I'm finding the price of coffee quite expensive, I think it is a small price to pay for 'the convenience' that I can easily find a coffee shop and study there whenever I need to.

  1. Even though there's nothing talking about any conveniences of the coffee shop before this sentence, when I want to make the situation or the gesture (I'm going to talk about the conveniences as soon as this sentence has finished or after this sentence finished, the thing I'm trying to talk about is the convenience of coffee shop. ), is it proper way to word 'the', reading it out loudly?

  2. For starter, here's an example.

The fact that nearly everyone has their own phone speaks for itself.

Here, 'the fact' is being followed by the perfect sentence. Then, can I phrase perfect sentence right after 'the convenience' in the same way as 'the fact'? When exactly is it possible to phrase perfect sentence structure after a noun?

  • I'm not sure about your title because I don't see any appositive clause in your examples. – Damkerng T. Feb 25 '15 at 7:14
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Even though I'm finding the price of coffee quite expensive, I think it is a small price to pay for 'the convenience' that I can easily find a coffee shop and study there whenever I need to.

"The convenience that..." is awkward. It's not the same as "The fact that..."

We say "convenience of".

Even though I'm finding the price of coffee quite expensive, the convenience of studying in a coffee shop whenever I need to is worth it.

We use "convenience of" instead of "convenience that" because the Latin origin of the word meant a "coming-together of (more than one thing)" which came to mean something like harmony or suitability. The things came together in a good way.

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