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Which word I should use when I would like to give my opinion to my manager politely that what he should do in a certain situation.

I don't want to talk in "I-know-better-than-you" tone or in "you-must-do-it" tone .

So here my options I think I can use:

I suggest you that you recruit more design engineers and focus on designing of the new product line.

can I use recommend and advise also ?

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    Note that advice is a noun; the verb is advise. Also, use "design engineer" rather than "designer engineer". – apsillers Mar 3 '15 at 19:58
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    This might be better on the Workplace.SE. You need to discuss why more people need to be hired. – mkennedy Mar 3 '15 at 20:00
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    I agree with @mkennedy. Many factors are needed to be taken into account, especially about the manager and his characteristics. He might feel overly offended than usual, or may just be someone "cool" (literally! :) Thus, more than ELL, this question has "Workplace.SE" traits, IMHO. – M.A.R. ಠ_ಠ Mar 3 '15 at 20:05
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    I think that while which exact sentence would be "best" is opinion based, I do think that we can help with the wording so the tone is appropriate, so I'm voting to leave this open. – ColleenV Mar 4 '15 at 14:50
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    I also voted to leave it open. There are certain grammatical expressions that express politeness and hesitancy. I would suggest, for example, instead I suggest. – user6951 Mar 4 '15 at 16:10
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It seems like you are volunteering information to your manager that he or she has not asked for, and could call into question her value or quality of decisions made as a manager. Be careful.

Suggest, recommends, and advise can be taken the wrong way if there is not an established direct relationship or context where your manager has already clearly asked you for suggestions of improvement. A manager who knows you well may not be taken aback, but others might consider you as challenging them.

The safest thing to do is to not make your manager the subject of the sentence at all, but use a sentence that deals only with the situation and what should be done to improve it. Avoid the use of "I" as well, use "we".

There should be/needs to be more design engineers and focus on designing of the new product line.

Even better is mentioning a desired result or positive consequence. This makes it task- or job- focused and not person-focused.

It would be [ positive consequence ] if there were more design engineers and focus on designing of the new product line.

With more design engineers and stronger focus on designing of the new product line, we could achieve [ positive consequence ] easier/better/more often.

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There are many ways. But I do it in a tricky way! So, this is my opinion.

The trick is to include 'WE' rather than 'YOU'. That said, you are talking about him but not in particular. When you call yourself 'we', you take the entire company but then when it comes to take decisions, that 'we' actually means 'him', the manager! That's what I said, there is no harm in using this trick!

See the difference it makes...

I suggest you that you recruit more design engineers and focus on designing of the new product line.

OVER...

I think we should recruit more design engineers and focus on designing of the new product line.

[I just replaced suggest with think and you with we].

That way, you indirectly advise him by giving your humble suggestion. You put your point without being dominant. It's polite, indirect, easy and tricky! :)

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