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We were opposites sides, though of the same coin, the same moon.

Would but been more appropiate?

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    I'd use... yet. – Damkerng T. Mar 11 '15 at 13:51
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I could not find anything better than this. That's the reason, I'm copying it entirely! It explains 'but vs. though' very nicely.

After a statement of intent, but introduces a clause with a contrasting thought— often an obstacle or reason for setback or defeat.

After a statement of intent, though introduces a clause with an obstacle or difficulty in the way of success – something that often can be overcome.

Scene 1 with 'but':

Brian is focused on the obstacles!

Brian hopes to find a new job, but few employers are hiring. He stood in line to get into a job fair, but he found nothing in marketing. He also, wants to go to business school, but he has no savings to pay tuition or to support himself while studying. He'd like to get some additional training; however, he's unsure where to get it. Brian doesn't know where to get started. He's letting the obstacles overcome him and keep him from his goals.

Scene 2 with 'though':

Brian is focused on his goals!

Brian hopes to find a new job though few employers are hiring. He stood in line to get into a job fair though he found nothing in marketing. He also, wants to go to business school although he has no savings to pay tuition or to support himself while studying. He'd like to get some additional training even though he's unsure where to get it. Brian is prepared for the challenge. He is overcoming challenges in order to meet his goals.

So to answer your question, it simply depends on what you think being opposite to the listener. :)

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