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This is from my thought:

iphone keeps releasing new versions every year. In order to be cool, I want to use the latest version. However, change the new iphone every year made me exhausted.

So is it ok to say "change the iphone version made me exhausted"?

  • It's certainly not okay to misspell the very word you're asking about (especially since you were able to get it right in the cited example itself). So I have corrected that aspect of your text, along with a couple of other errors in the citation (which probably reflect your sloppy transcription rather than the speaker's errors). – FumbleFingers Mar 12 '15 at 17:43
  • chasing, maybe. – pjc50 Mar 16 '15 at 16:48
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No, because versions is not something typically used with the word chase - it could work, but a lot of context is needed. When chase is used most of the time it is synonymous with the physical act of running.

The verb phrase you want to use is trying to keep up with, or just keeping up with:

However, trying to keep up with the new iPhone every year made me exhausted.

However, keeping up with the new iPhone every year made me exhausted.

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Short answer, no.

Exchanging your phone for the latest model is called upgrading. You upgrade to a new phone. So you could say:

However, upgrading to the new iphone every year made me exhausted.

Your first sentence also isn't quite right. It's missing an article, and 'year' should be singular.

iphone keeps releasing a new version every year.

However, since the company that releases the iPhone is Apple, I would phrase it slightly differently. Here's how I would write it:

Apple keeps releasing a new version of the iPhone every year. In order to be cool, I want to use the latest version. However, upgrading to the new iPhone every year made me exhausted.

The use of the past tense in the last sentence implies that you no longer upgrade every year. If you still do, then change it to 'makes me exhausted'.

  • 1
    That was an excellent step-by-step re-write. I would also consider using a modifier for "exhausted". Granted it could be assumed that he was mentally or physically exhausted without having to add a modifier, but he could have also been exhausted in other types or degrees by upgrading. I would also consider changing the tense of "exhaust". – Gary Mar 12 '15 at 21:29

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